families against chemical toxins · lead in water · toxic chemicals

National Problem: Lead Tests Reveal 64 Public Schools In Washington, D.C. Had High Lead Levels In Drinking Water

The results of lead testing done at 113 D.C. public schools in April, May, and June of 2016 revealed elevated lead levels in drinking water in 64 schools according to the article D.C. Public Schools’ Water for Lead.  More Than 60 Had High Levels.  The federal action level set by the Environmental Protection Agency is 15 parts per billion (ppb) for lead in public water systems.  However, in June 2016 the D.C. Department of General Services adopted a 1 ppb action level for lead tests on drinking water sources in all D.C. public school and parks and recreation centers.  The more stringent policy complies with the American Academy of Pediatrics report, Prevention of Childhood Lead Toxicity, which recommends that lead testing resulting in a reading of more than 1 ppb should bdc-leade immediately remediated.

FACT supports D.C.’s new policy to lower the actionable lead level from 15 to 1 ppb per the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations.  Just as important is D.C.’s remediation efforts which includes the installation of filters on all drinking water sources at public schools, public libraries, and recreation centers. The new policy is estimated to cost the District nearly $2 m
illion at the onset.  This is a small price to pay in order to ensure that children are not exposed to harmful levels of lead.  Recent research has found that even very low levels of lead exposure can have a detrimental impact on a child’s IQ, likelihood of having a learning disability, educational attainment, and reading readiness at kindergarten entry. Tens of millions of U.S. children have been adversely affected by lead exposure in the years since its negative effects were first discovered.  It is a costly disease, with recent estimates putting its price tag at over $50 billion in a single year due to lost economic productivity resulting from reduced cognitive potential.  Click here for more information on lead’s negative health effects on children.

A full list of drinking water sources that tested above the EPA’s action level of 15 ppb can be found here.  Below see an abbreviated list of high lead levels found in drinking fountains in D.C. public schools.

Eliot-Hine Middle

Sink in art room 2-189 , 77 parts per billion

Water cooler (type of fountain) in third floor girls locker room, 23 parts per billion

H.D. Cooke Elementary

Fountain in classroom 314, 308 parts per billion

Fountain in classroom 313, 20.5 parts per billion

 Hart Middle School

Water cooler (type of fountain) in hallway adjecent to room 023, 23 parts per billion

Water cooler (type of fountain) in hallway adjacent to room 023, 26 parts per billion

Ketcham Elementary

Fountain in room 113, 33 parts per billion

Water cooler (type of fountain) in hallway adjacent to 214 conference room, 144 parts per billion:

Kimball Elementary

Utility device in room 122, 18.4 parts per billion

Sink in science lab 201, 27 parts per billion

Water cooler (type of fountain) in hallway north wing adjacent science lab 203, 47.2 parts per billion

 Roosevelt @ McFarland

Water cooler (type of fountain) (right) in classroom 304 -02 , 26.9 parts per billion

Sousa

Fountain in room A-309, 24.6 parts per billion

Fountain (south wall, right) in classroom B104 , 97.3 parts per billion

Fountain in room 104-B , 26.1 parts per billion

Tubman

Water cooler (type of fountain) in hallway adjacent to room 110 , 60.4 parts per billion

Turner

Fountain (right low) in classroom 117, 249 parts per billion

Fountain (right low) in classroom 116 , 18.5 parts per billion

Tyler

Water cooler (type of fountain) (left high) in hallway adjacent to main office, 591 parts per billion

Water cooler (type of fountain) (low) in hallway adjacent to main office , 22 parts per billion

Walker-Jones

Fountain (right) in room 310, 89.6 parts per billion

Fountain (right) in classroom 310, 29.8 parts per billion

Fountain (right) in classroom 310 , 168 parts per billion

Fountain (right) in classroom 120, 87.3 parts per billion

Washington Metro

Fountain in nurses’ office, 31 parts per billion

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